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TABLE OF CONTENTS
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-What's Happening at ASBO International
-Renew Your Membership
-Career Central
-Feature: Accountability and the Modern Teachers' Union
-Member Spotlight
-Member Anniversaries
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Who Inspires You?

Who’s been an inspiration in your school business career? Nominate that visionary leader for an Eagle Award, a lifetime achievement award in school business. Applications are due June 1. Proudly sponsored by AXA.

 
Webinar: Funding Education Fairly at the State Level—Stories from the States

Even if you were unable to participate in last month’s webinar that focused on the state’s role in funding education fairly, we encourage you to register for a follow-up webinar on May 7 at 2:00 p.m. EDT. Hosted by the National Opportunity to Learn Campaign, the focus is on lessons learned from past school funding campaigns. Participants will learn details of some of these state stories and take away the messaging, framing, and tactics behind successful campaigns. Register today!

 
The Affordable Healthcare Act: What School Leaders Need to Know

Take a break with ASBO Radio and tune into “The Affordable Healthcare Act: What School Leaders Need to Know” as Susan Relland, vice president of American Fidelity Assurance Company, discusses the basics about preparing your district for upcoming healthcare reform changes. Missed an ASBO Radio interview? Browse our archives now.

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Your Membership Is Due for Renewal

Don't let Accents Online, School Business Affairs, School Business Daily, access to the Global School Business Network and all of other your member benefits slip out of your hands. It's time to renew your ASBO International membership. Use the link above to log in and renew your membership online, using your credit card for payment. If you have forgotten your username or password, click "Reset My Password."

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Career Central

Budget Director, Adams 12 Five Star School, Thornton, Colorado

State Director, Finance and Operations, Renaissance School Services, New Jersey

Assistant Superintendent of Business & Operations, Shaker Heights Schools, Ohio

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Accountability and the Modern Teachers' Union

Can teachers’ unions play a role in accountability? Yes, they can, according to National Center on Education and the Economy President Marc Tucker. His recent blog series addresses this issue, and one in particular asks the following: How can we move to a professional model of teaching when we have unions based on a blue-collar model of teaching?

Tucker points out that although in the U.S., the states with the strongest student performance are often the ones with the strongest teachers’ unions, and that some of the strongest performers around the globe also have strong teachers’ unions, no evidence ties the two together.

However, a closer look at underperforming districts and schools frequently reveals that it is union contracts that make it impossible to hold them accountable. These contracts may control which teachers can work in certain schools, which are appointed to leadership roles, which can be fired, and much more. The establishment of American labor laws and the evolution of collective bargaining in education have resulted in situations where there is nobody clearly in charge, and therefore no one at whom to point an accusing finger. Who suffers? The teachers—and their reputations.

Tucker approached the National Education Association (NEA) years ago, proposing that they refrain from defending antiquated and counterproductive practices in schools—those that were viewed as beneficial to teachers, not students—and instead take the lead in transforming teaching into a true profession by raising the quality of teachers to much higher standards.

“They have nothing to lose and everything to gain by doing that,” Tucker says. He explains that other high-status professions have successfully done the very same thing. He adds that it wouldn’t cost more to do so, since costly teacher attrition rates would fall dramatically as quality rises. Higher-quality teachers would lead to better-performing students, thereby enhancing the status of teachers and making it easier to raise their compensation. It would also earn the public’s trust of teachers, aiding in their increased professional autonomy as well. And while this may sound like an ideal hypothetical situation, it is exactly what has happened in top-performing countries.
Read More ASBO
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Member Spotlight: Leyton Miles, CPA, MBA
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Regardless of where they live or where their funding is derived, school business officials around the world are working to make the most out of their available resources. Just ask Leyton Miles, business manager for Ivanhoe Grammar School in Victoria, Australia.

In the United States, most public schools (those that receive government funding as their primary source of revenue) are clustered into school districts; however, schools in Australia are not. Instead, each school is classified as either public/state or private/independent. Leyton explains that public schools receive all their income through funding from state and federal governments. Private schools like Ivanhoe Grammar School receive the majority of their income from paying parents and some government funding. “Private schools are usually a company limited by guarantee, have a board or school council governing them, and report their financials to government bodies,” Leyton says. “All education institutions in Australia are classified as ‘not-for-profit.’”

Ivanhoe Grammar School currently has more than 2,000 students from age 3 through the equivalent of 12th grade on two separate campuses located about 25 kilometers apart. Leyton has served as Ivanhoe’s business manager for the past 12 years and is proud to have played a major role in producing positive financial results for the school each year. Thanks to prudent financial management, the school has been able to embark on an extensive building program, ensuring the very best facilities for staff and students.

“Working in schools is quite a unique profession,” Leyton says. “The ability for others to share and help you in your role simply does not happen in many other fields.” He looks forward to attending his fifth ASBO International Annual Meeting & Expo as an International Aspects Committee member later this year as well as being part of Ivanhoe Grammar School’s centenary celebrations in 2015.
Connect with Leyton ASBO
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Congratulations to ASBO Member Brent Rausch

Congratulations to Brent Rausch, secretary-treasurer of Swan Valley School District in Swan River, Manitoba. This month, Brent is celebrating 20 years of membership. Congratulations to all ASBO International members celebrating milestone membership anniversaries in May!

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